8 Best APS-C Cameras

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What are the best APS-C camera choices this year, and why might you want one? That’s what this buyer’s guide is all about. Even full-frame enthusiasts find room for an APS-C in the kit bag. These capable cameras have advanced a lot in a short space of time. Raw beginners reading here should first understand what a digital camera sensor is to appreciate the comparison.

Budget
best-budget-aps-c-camera
Ricoh GR III Digital Camera
4.5/5.0
Sensor: 24MP APS-C
Battery Life: 200 shots
Travel-friendly, 3” touchscreen, built-in WiFi, RAW shooting, image stabilization.
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Best Value
best-value-aps-c-camera
Nikon D500 APS-C Digital-SLR
4.8/5.0
Sensor: 21MP APS-C
Battery Life: 1240 shots
Solid build, ergonomics, tilting 3.2” LCD touchscreen, top LCD, 4K video.
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Top Pick
top-value-aps-c-camera
Leica CL Mirrorless Camera
4.7/5.0
Sensor: 24MP APS-C
Battery Life: 220 shots
Ultra-compact, electronic viewfinder, LCD touchscreen, customizable dials.
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Sensors Simplified

An image sensor is a physical part of a digital camera, so that makes it a piece of hardware. It’s also a solid-state component, which means there are no moving parts, hence the term. The job of a sensor is to capture light and convert it into an image. With cameras, that light is whatever you see through the viewfinder or LCD screen. Thus, digital sensors are the electronic version of film.

Bigger is better when it comes to sensor size, but it doesn’t always matter (more on that soon). Larger sensors capture more light, and that makes them superior in low-light situations. They also produce higher quality images with greater details. That’s especially noticeable when blowing photos up.

APS-C CMOS Sensors

APS-C stands for Advanced Photo System Type C. It’s fast becoming a favored sensor size in modern mid-range digital cameras. It’s smaller than the full-frame 35mm sensor but bigger than micro 4/3. The typical ASP-C sensor size is 23.5 x 15.6mm, aside from Canon cameras. Canon APS-C sensors are slightly smaller at 22.3 x 14.9mm.

APS-C Vs. Full-Frame (FF)

APS-C cameras have 3 things going for them over full-frame alternatives:

  1. Lighter and more compact
  2. APS-C digital cameras and lenses cost less
  3. Easier to use

Only the most critical of eyes notice any significant difference in image quality between the two. Seriously, APS-C cameras are exceptional tools. Professionals use FF cameras because the pro-bodies have a plethora of pro-features. They also offer more depth of field (DOF) control and better dynamic range. But the heft of an FF camera makes them bulky and cumbersome to use in comparison.

Only you can know if the benefits of a full-frame digital camera are worth the extra cost. Almost every photographer at every level now values the latest models of APS-C cameras.

About My ‘Best APS-C Camera’ Guide

Some APS-C cameras are better than others, though most of the newer choices are remarkable. There’s no perfect camera, but there are models that are perfect for individual photographers. I’ve selected 8 ASP-C products for review across all budgets. These picks are favored by industry experts and receive plenty of positive feedback from those who buy them.

The table shows the products as they appear on the page. The three at the top are the Editor’s Picks for the Best Budget ASP-C camera, Best Value, and the Top Choice.

APS-C Cameras Comparison Table

1. Ricoh GR III APS-C Digital Camera | Best Budget

Ricoh GR III APS-C Digital CameraView on Amazon

Editor’s Rating: 4.5/5

The Best Budget APS-C camera goes to the travel-friendly Ricoh GR III. It’s equipped with a fixed 28mm F/2.8–16 prime lens and a large 24MP APS-C-size CMOS Sensor.

  • Best feature 1: 24MP APS-C-size CMOS sensor
  • Best feature 2: Advanced point-and-shoot compact
  • Plus points: Travel-friendly, 3” touchscreen, built-in WiFi, RAW shooting, image stabilization
  • Minus points: Glossy touchscreen, subpar battery life, no built-in flash, slow AF

Ricoh GR III Camera Highlights

Ricoh’s GR Digital III is a prime example of an advanced point-n-shoot camera with a large APS-C- sensor. The small form is welcome as more photographers demand compact, lightweight, travel-friendly products. It also boasts streamlined controls and a 3” LCD touchscreen display for easy navigation. The GR III lens is tack sharp and excels in close-focus photography.

This camera doesn’t have a built-in flash, but it does have an external hot-shoe. Ricoh’s GR III is super-comfortable to hold and operate, thanks to its ergonomic pocketable design. Other key features are the built-in WiFi, image stabilization, RAW shooting, and manual controls. The 1080P video at 60fps is decent rather than exceptional, but then this is primarily a tool for capturing stills.

See the Ricoh GR III tech specs and pros table below for more features and functions.

The Not So Good

The touchscreen is welcome, but its reflective finish makes visibility hard in bright sunlight. It doesn’t tilt either, which would have lessened the problem somewhat. Another letdown is the miserable battery life that delivers just 200 shots max per charge. Two other negatives are no built-in flash and the slow-responding autofocus in low light situations. That’s an issue for low-light photographers.

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Tech Specs
Brand Name: Ricoh
Camera Type: Advanced compact
Sensor: 24MP APS-C
Video Resolution: 1080P
Stills: 24 megapixels
Max Shutter speed: 1/4000s
Max Aperture: F/2.8
Card Support: UHS-I
Battery: DB-110
Battery Life: 200 shots
Screen Type: Fixed 3” LCD Screen
Camera Weight: 9.1 oz.
Dimensions: 4.3 x 2.4 x 1.3”
The Pros
Advanced point-and-shoot camera
Travel-friendly, ergonomic design
Fast shutter speed
Face Detection Focusing
24MP APS-C-size CMOS sensor
Good sized touchscreen
Built-in WiFi
RAW shooting
Image stabilization (IS)
Manual controls
AE Bracketing
Remote control w/ smartphone
The Cons
Glossy touchscreen
Subpar battery life
No built-in flash
Slow AF, especially in low-light

2. Nikon D500 APS-C Digital-SLR | Best Value

Nikon D500 APS-C Digital-SLRView on Amazon

Editor’s Rating: 4.8/5

Nikon’s D500 is a popular high-end entry-level F mount DSLR camera with a 21MP APS-C sensor. There are over 300 native lenses available, so the photographic potential is massive.

  • Best feature 1: 21MP APS-C sensor
  • Best feature 2: Superb autofocus (AF) system
  • Plus points: Solid build, ergonomics, tilting 3.2” LCD touchscreen, top LCD, 4K video
  • Minus points: Subpar movie autofocus, no focus peaking

Nikon D500 Digital-SLR Highlights

The Nikon D500 is an exceptional Digital-SLR for its class, and a camera that oozes with confidence. It boasts superb ergonomics and a durable magnesium alloy body. The camera’s water-drop and dust resistance make it a capable tool for shooting outdoors in harsher climes. Its large, 3.2” tilting LCD touchscreen lets you compose shots effortlessly from low, high, or awkward angles.

Nikon’s D500 also has a top-mounted LCD, which is invaluable for tripod work and night photography. The camera’s superb AF and fast continuous shooting make it a remarkable tool for action. Think wildlife, sports, and all other movement photography. Image quality is about as good as it gets for a digital camera in this price category. The D500 supports UHS-II memory cards.

Photographers appreciate the illuminated buttons, long 1240 shots battery life, and dual card slots. Other standout features are the built-in WiFi, Bluetooth, and NFC Connectivity. Videographers get ultra-HD 4K video, a headphone port, and an external microphone port.

See the Nikon D500 tech specs and pros table below for more features and functions.

The Not So Good

There are a few negatives that could be deal-breakers for videographers. The movie autofocus is far from impressive. The camera doesn’t have a focus peaking either. And the so-called ‘Silent Mode’ is a bit misleading. It is quiet, but it’s not soundless. Finally, this model is an expensive choice if you don’t need a camera for action photography.

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Tech Specs
Brand Name: Nikon
Camera Type: Digital-SLR
Sensor: 21MP APS-C CMOS
Max Video Resolution: 4K
Stills: 21 megapixels
Max Shutter speed: 1/8000s
Card Support: UHS-II
Battery: EN-EL15 Rechargeable Li-ion
Battery Life: 1240 shots
Screen Type: 3.2” Tilting LCD Touchscreen
Camera Weight: 30.33 oz.
Dimensions: 5.79 x 4.53 x 3.19”
The Pros
36 impressive features & functions
21MP APS-C sensor
Superb autofocus (AF) system
Solid build, excellent ergonomics
Illuminated function buttons
Environmental sealing
Articulating touchscreen
Top-mounted LCD panel
External mic port
Headphone port
Flash sync port
Built-in WiFi, Bluetooth, NFC
Fast continuous shooting
Long battery life
Remote control w/ smartphone
The Cons
Subpar movie autofocus
No focus peaking
Not truly silent mode
Quite expensive

3. Leica CL APS-C Mirrorless Camera | Top Pick

Leica CL APS-C Mirrorless CameraView on Amazon

Editor’s Rating: 4.7/5

The Editor’s Top Pick goes to the Leica CL. It’s a high-quality compact mirrorless digital camera with a 24MP APS-C CMOS Sensor. This beauty comes equipped with a Leica 18mm F/2.8 pancake lens.

  • Best feature 1: 24MP APS-C CMOS sensor format
  • Best feature 2: Large 3” touchscreen LCD
  • Plus points: Ultra-compact, electronic viewfinder, LCD touchscreen, customizable dials
  • Minus points: Fixed screen, no in-body flash, high price tag

Leica CL Mirrorless Camera Highlights

Leica’s CL appeals to those who seek a minimalistic yet highly functional camera. Its compact, solid metal finish and user-friendly handling make it an excellent travel camera. The electronic viewfinder gives users a comfortable and bright eye-level view. There’s also a large 3” LCD touchscreen on the rear. On the top are a couple of dials with customizable buttons in the centers.

The CL’s 14.2MP image quality is remarkable, but then you’d expect it to be in this category. Videographers don’t get a lot of creative control, but the camera can shoot in 4K at 30fps. Other highlights include built-in WiFi, smartphone remote control, and time-lapse recording. My biggest gripe with this otherwise exceptional mirrorless Leica is the low, 220-shot battery life.

See the Leica CL tech specs and pros table below for more features and functions.

The Not So Good

It’s easier to damage articulating touchscreens by accident, but few would dispute their versatility. The Leica CL is restricted as it has a fixed display. It doesn’t have a built-in flash, either, though it does have a hot shoe for external flash units. And no environmental sealing means you must be extra careful on bad weather days. Finally, the camera’s high price tag puts it out of reach for some.

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Tech Specs
Brand Name: Leica
Camera Type: Semipro mirrorless
Sensor: 24MP APS-C CMOS
Lens Mount: Leica L
Max Video Resolution: 4K
Stills: 24 megapixels
Max Shutter speed: 1/25000s
Max Aperture: F/2.8
Card Support: UHS-II
Battery: Leica BP-DC12 Lithium-Ion
Battery Life: 220 shots
Screen Type: Fixed 3” LCD touchscreen
Camera Weight: 14.22 oz. (body only)
Dimensions: 5.16 x 3.07 x 1.77”
The Pros
24MP APS-C CMOS sensor
Rear touchscreen LCD
Ultra-compact and lightweight
Built-in electronic viewfinder
Built-in WiFi
Large touchscreen
Top-mounted customizable dials
Flash sync port
Remote control w/ smartphone
Face Detection Focusing
The Cons
LCD screen doesn’t tilt
No built-in flash
Doesn’t have weather sealing
High price tag
Low battery life

4. Nikon Z50 DX-format APS-C Digital Camera

Nikon Z50 DX-format APS-C Digital CameraView on Amazon

Editor’s Rating: 4.6/5

Meet the Nikon Z 50. It’s an entry-level mirrorless camera with a 21MP APS-C BSI-CMOS Sensor. It comes with the very capable NIKKOR Z DX 16–50mm f/3.5 to f/6.3 VR lens.

  • Best feature 1: 21MP APS-C BSI-CMOS Sensor
  • Best feature 2: Lightweight, compact, and rugged
  • Plus points: Easy handling, large EVF, 4K video, built-in flash, deep grip, image quality, WiFi
  • Minus points: Few native lenses, no image stabilization

Nikon Z50 DX-format Camera Highlights

Nikon’s Z50 is the smallest interchangeable camera of the entire Z series. Consider this model if you want a lightweight, compact DX-format camera with a rich feature set. Don’t let the small form fool you as Nikon’s made this puppy using magnesium-alloy. It’s a joy to handle with its solid feel and pleasing ergonomics. The deep, comfortable grip and angled shutter button are especially welcome.

The large EVF is a bonus, and image quality also gets a big thumbs-up. The colors are accurate, and there’s little to no retouching needed for most shots taken with the Standard Picture Control. Other features worth a mention are built-in WiFi, Bluetooth, articulating touchscreen, and a weather-sealed body. Videographers get 4K video and a microphone port for enhanced audio control.

See the Nikon Z 50 tech specs and pros table below for more features and functions.

The Not So Good

There are only 15 native lenses for the Nikon Z lens mount at the last check. The camera doesn’t have image stabilization, but two of the 15 lenses offer optical image stabilization (OIS). Another con for the Z50 is its low battery life that only gives 320 shots per charge.

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Tech Specs
Brand Name: Nikon
Camera Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: 21MP APS-C BSI-CMOS
Mount: Nikon Z lens
Max Video Resolution: 4K
Stills: 21 megapixels
Max Shutter speed: 1/4000 sec
Max Aperture: 3.5
Card Support: UHS-II
Battery: EN-EL25 rechargeable
Battery Life: 320 shots
Screen Type: 3.2” articulating touchscreen
Camera Weight: 14 oz.
Dimensions: 5 x 3.7 x 2.36”
The Pros
21MP APS-C BSI-CMOS Sensor
Lightweight, compact, and rugged
Easy handling
Articulating touchscreen
Large Electronic viewfinder
UHD video capability
External mic port
Flash sync port
Environmental sealing
Time-lapse recording
Built-in flash
Built-in WiFi
Bluetooth
Deep, comfortable grip
Superb image quality
Face detection focusing
Remote control w/ smartphone
The Cons
Few native lenses
No in-body image stabilization
Low battery life

5. Canon EOS 7D Mark II APS-C Digital-SLR

Canon EOS 7D Mark II APS-C Digital-SLRView on Amazon

Editor’s Rating: 4.5/5

Canon brought the EOS 7D Mark II out to replace the 7D. It’s characterized by the 20MP APS-C CMOS Sensor and Dual DIGIC 6 processors. Let’s look at what else it offers.

  • Best feature 1: 20MP APS-C CMOS Sensor, Dual DIGIC 6 processors
  • Best feature 2: Large bright 3” LCD screen
  • Plus points: Rugged build, ergonomic body, weather-sealed, top LCD, OVF, dual card slots
  • Minus points: No articulating touchscreen, no built-in WiFi, no image stabilization (IS)

Canon EOS 7D Mark II Camera Highlights

Canon’s EOS 7D Mark II has a rugged magnesium alloy weather-sealed body. The dust and moisture-resistance let you focus more on the shoot and less on the weather. At the back is a large 3” anti-reflective, smudge-resistant LCD screen. There’s also a built-in eye-level optical viewfinder (OVF) with 100% coverage for composition accuracy. The dual memory card slots are another welcome feature.

This camera’s body is heavy at over 32 ounces, but it feels solid and instills confidence. The top-mounted LCD panel is invaluable for night shoots or working low to the ground. Other selling points are the built-in GPS and long battery life of around 670 shots per charge. The 7D Mark II takes impressive high-resolution stills, thanks to its 20.2MP APS-C CMOS sensor and Dual DIGIC 6 processors.

Acceptable Video

For video, you get to shoot Full-HD 1080p at a range of frame rates. The external mic and headphone ports are sure to please videographers too. Video quality is more than acceptable for most situations. Those who want the highest resolution should consider cameras with Ultra-HD 4K video, though.

See the Canon’s EOS 7D Mark II tech specs and pros table below for more features and functions.

The Not So Good

The rear LCD screen is the fixed type, and that restricts its usefulness. It’s not a touchscreen either. The absence of an articulating touchscreen is something that bothers you, or it doesn’t. Other missing features are built-in WiFi and no image stabilization. However, 100 native lenses offer optical image stabilization for Canon’s EF/EF-S lens mount.

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Tech Specs
Brand Name: Canon
Camera Type: Semi-Pro DSLR
Sensor: 20MP APS-C CMOS
Mount: Canon EF/EF-S
Max Video Resolution: 1080p
Stills: 20 megapixels
Max Shutter speed: 1/8000s
Card Support 1: SD/SDHC/SDXC (UHS-I)
Card Support 2: CompactFlash (UDMA 7)
Battery: LP-E6N Lithium-Ion
Battery Life: 670 shots
Screen Type: 3.0” Clear View II LCD
Camera Weight: 32.10 oz.
Dimensions: 5.87 x 4.41 x 3.07”
The Pros
20mp APS-C CMOS sensor
Dual DIGIC 6 processors
Large bright LCD screen
Top-mounted LCD panel
Rugged magnesium-alloy build
Good ergonomics
Weather-sealed body
Optical viewfinder (OVF)
Dual memory card slots
Built-in GPS
Flash sync port
AF micro adjustment
Long battery life
Good low light ISO
External microphone port
External headphone port
Time-lapse recording
Face Detection Focusing
The Cons
No articulating screen
No touch controls
No built-in WiFi
No image stabilization (IS)

6. Fujifilm X100F APS-C Digital Camera

Fujifilm X100F APS-C Digital CameraView on Amazon

Editor’s Rating: 4.8/5

This review is for the Fujifilm X100F. It’s a premium compact camera with a large 24.3MP APS-C CMOS sensor. The X100F has a fixed Fujinon 23mm fast F/2 Prime Lens with a built-in ND filter.

  • Best feature 1: Large 24.3MP APS-C CMOS sensor
  • Best feature 2: Bright, wide-angle lens
  • Plus points: Easy to use, built-in ND filter, manual controls, hot shoe, RAW, battery life
  • Minus points: No tilt or touchscreen, no IS, heavy body, not weather-sealed

Fujifilm X100F Camera Highlights

The simplicity of the Fujifilm X100F is one of its main attractions. It’s a niche product that boasts tack-sharp images, ease-of-use, and an elegant style. The fixed 23mm f/2 wide-angle prime lens challenges one’s creative side and makes you a better photographer. The manual focusing and manual exposure controls also encourage creativity. A built-in 3-stop neutral density (ND) filter is another nice touch.

This camera has an integrated flash and a hot-shoe to mount an external flash of your choosing. Other quality features include built-in WiFi, electronic and optical viewfinder, and RAW shooting. You can use a regular smartphone to control some features remotely. The X100F battery life is quite decent at 390 shots per charge. That’s 90 shots above average for a camera in its class.

The highest video resolution is 1080p Full-HD up to 60fps (frames per second). And the external microphone port is a must-have feature for videographers who demand the best audio.

See the Fujifilm X100F tech specs and pros table below for more features and functions.

The Not So Good

A few features are missing that may be deal-breakers for some. The rear LCD is the view only fixed variety, so no tilt function or touch control. Another con is the lack of image stabilization. That’s not such an issue with lightweight compacts, but the X100F has a heavy, 1.03 lb. body. The last con is the absence of environmental sealing. That means you must take extra care when shooting outdoors.

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Tech Specs
Brand Name: Fujifilm
Camera Type: Large sensor compact
Sensor: 24MP APS-C CMOS X-TRANS III
Mount: Fixed lens
Max Vid Resolution: FHD 1080p @ 60fps
Stills: 24 megapixels
Max Shutter speed: 1/4000 sec
Max Aperture: F/2
Card Support: 32GB UHS-I
Battery: NP-W126S Lithium-Ion
Battery Life: 390 shots
Screen Type: Fixed 3” LCD
Camera Weight: 16.54 oz.
Dimensions: 5 x 2.95 x 2.05”
The Pros
Large 24.3MP APS-C CMOS sensor
Fast, wide-angle prime lens
Comfortable and easy to use
Built-in ND filter
Built-in WiFi
EVF and OVF viewfinders
Fast shutter speeds
Manual focusing
Manual Exposure
External hot shoe
External microphone port
RAW shooting
Above average battery life
Time-lapse recording
AE bracketing
Fast continuous Shooting
Remote control w/ smartphone
The Cons
No articulating or touchscreen
No image stabilization
Heavy body
Lacks weather-sealing

7. Sony Alpha a6400 Compact APS-C Camera

Sony Alpha a6400 Compact APS-C CameraView on Amazon

Editor’s Rating: 4.7/5

The penultimate review goes to the much-loved Sony Alpha a6400. It’s a semi-professional mirrorless camera with a 24MP APS-C CMOS sensor. This one comes with a capable 18-135mm zoom lens.

  • Best feature 1: Large 24MP APS-C CMOS sensor
  • Best feature 2: Great all-rounder 18-135mm zoom lens
  • Plus points: Compact & travel-friendly, 3” flip screen, EVF, good in low light, WiFi, Bluetooth
  • Minus points: Quite heavy, no image stabilization, average battery life

Sony Alpha a6400 Camera Highlights

Sony has packed a lot of camera into this small, light-tight box it calls the Alpha a6400. There are about 30 noteworthy features and functions and only a couple of negatives. It has a neat, compact, travel-friendly build that fits nicely into the hands. The camera sports a large 3” LCD flip screen and a sharp built-in electronic viewfinder (EVF). The included 18-135mm lens is an exceptional all-rounder.

Sony’s 24.2MP APS-C sensor and improved BIONZ X processor deliver detailed stills with true color reproduction. The camera’s Phase Detection Autofocus (AF) is fast and accurate in most photographic situations. There’s plenty of user praise for the camera’s exceptional low-light capability too. Other highlights include a built-in WiFi, Bluetooth, NFC connectivity, and a weather-sealed body.

There’s a handy built-in flash and a hot shoe to mount external units. This camera is a capable video tool as well, offering 4K UHD recording. You also get an external mic port to enhance the audio.

See the Alpha a6400 tech specs and pros table below for more features and functions.

The Not So Good

There are no major negatives with the Sony Alpha a6400 digital mirrorless camera. OK, it’s on the heavy side of average, and image stabilization would have been welcome. Still, there are around 30 native lenses that have optical image stabilization (OIS). The battery life is only average, with about 400+ shots per charge. Any other negative points are minor nitpicks rather than serious cons.

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Tech Specs
Brand Name: Sony
Camera Type: Semi-Pro mirrorless
Sensor: 24MP APS-C CMOS
Mount: Sony E lens
Max Video Resolution: 4K
Stills: 24 megapixels
Shutter speed: 1/4000 sec
Max Aperture: F/3.5
Card Support: UHS-I
Battery: NP-FW50 Lithium-Ion
Battery Life: 410 shots
Screen Type: 3” tilting LCD touchscreen
Camera Weight: 14.22 oz.
Dimensions: 4.72 x 2.64 x 2.36″
The Pros
Large 24MP APS-C CMOS sensor
All-rounder 18-135mm lens
Compact & travel-friendly
Rugged body w/ magnesium alloy
Environmental sealing
Large, bright flip screen
Electronic viewfinder (EVF)
Built-in flash
Flash hot shoe
Excels in low light
Built-in WiFi
Bluetooth
NFC connectivity
External mic port
Time-lapse recording
Face Detection Focusing
Panorama shooting
120 high-speed video
Remote control w/ smartphone
The Cons
Quite heavy
No in-body image stabilization
Average battery life

8. FUJIFILM X-T3 Mirrorless APC-C Camera

FUJIFILM X-T3 Mirrorless APC-C CameraView on Amazon

Editor’s Rating: 4.4/5

Last of the current lineup is for the FUJIFILM X-T3. It’s a semi-pro mirrorless type camera with an APS-C BSI-CMOS sensor. This one comes with a FUJIFILM XF 18–55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS zoom lens.

  • Best feature 1: Large 26MP APS-C BSI CMOS Sensor
  • Best feature 2: XF 18–55mm f/2.8-4 zoom lens
  • Plus points: Compact design, well-made, EVF, large LCD touchscreen, 4K video
  • Minus points: No sensor-based image stabilization, low-average battery life

FUJIFILM X-T3 Mirrorless Camera Highlights

FUJIFILM designed this unique mirrorless camera with photographers and videographers in mind. The quality of the high-resolution stills and 4K DCI video is exceptional. Videographers have access to an external microphone and headphone ports. FUJIFILM’s X-T3 has environmental sealing, dual SD card storage slots, and a flash sync port. You can also control many of its features via a smartphone.

The camera’s compact design has a slim lens mount and a reasonable handgrip. There are convenient on-body controls, a built-in electronic viewfinder (EVF), and a rear 3.0” articulating LCD touchscreen. There are 27 noteworthy features in total and only a couple of downsides.

See the FUJIFILM X-T3 tech specs and pros table below for more features and functions.

The Not So Good

This camera would have been close to perfect if it wasn’t for a couple of negatives. It doesn’t have any sensor-based image stabilization. That means you must invest in the costlier lenses with optical image stabilization (OIS) if you want them. There are currently 12 of the 51 native lenses with OIS. The battery life is on the poor side of average for a mirrorless model at only 390 shots per charge.

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Tech Specs
Brand Name: Fujifilm
Camera Type: Semi-pro mirrorless
Sensor: 26MP APS-C BSI CMOS
Mount: Fujifilm X lens
Max Video Resolution: 4K
Stills: 26 megapixels
Max Shutter speed: 1/8000 sec
Max Aperture: F/2.8
Card Support: UHS-II
Battery: NP-W126S Lithium-Ion
Battery Life: 390 shots
Screen Type: 3” LCD tilt touchscreen
Camera Weight: 19.01 oz.
Dimensions: 5.24 x 3.66 x 2.32”
The Pros
26MP APS-C BSI CMOS Sensor
XF 18–55mm f/2.8-4 zoom lens
Compact design
Well-made, rugged body
Environmental sealing
Exceptional video & stills quality
Electronic viewfinder (EVF)
External mic port
External headphone port
Large LCD touchscreen
Built-in WiFi
Bluetooth connectivity
Full sensor AF coverage
Dual SD card slots
Remote control w/ smartphone
Face Detection Focusing
Time-lapse Recording
The Cons
No sensor-based image stabilization
Low-average battery life

OK, that’s it for this guide. Some cameras get upgrades while others get replaced over time. I’ll update this page periodically to reflect any changes as they occur.

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